COPING WITH NATURAL DISASTERS: THE ROLE OF LOCAL HEALTH PERSONNEL AND THE COMMUNITY
( By A Working Guide (WHO - OMS, 1989) )

Reading Room Home

Pages: Index | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62
Chapter 1.Reception at the health centre or hospital

The volunteers assisting the local health personnel organize the reception of the victims and those accompanying them at the health facility. It is essential to:


Speak to those arriving, answer their questions and tell them where they can put themselves.

Give them blankets if they are cold.

Help them wash if necessary (people extricated from the rubble, people covered in mud, etc.) and give them tea or coffee.

Look after the children.

Help scattered families to reunite or communicate.

Identify the injured, giving priority to whose who are unconscious or are not accompanied by members of their families. The name of the injured person and the place he or she was brought from will be noted on a sheet of paper, which will be placed in a plastic cover, for example, and attached to the person concerned. When the victimís name is not known, a note must be made of the information supplied by the rescue workers, which can later make identification easier (place where the victim was found, the circumstances, other persons present, etc.).



Figure

TOP