COPING WITH NATURAL DISASTERS: THE ROLE OF LOCAL HEALTH PERSONNEL AND THE COMMUNITY
( By A Working Guide (WHO - OMS, 1989) )

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Chapter 6.Improving certain professional skills

A useful means of preparing for emergency situations is to launch training and further training activities on aspects of professional work that become particularly important in the event of a disaster. For example, national Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies organize first-aid courses designed to train volunteers who can intervene in emergencies. In these activities allowance must also be made for the situation of isolation and overload that may arise. Experts from specialized centres can help the local personnel improve their skills. Training that should be considered includes:


A. How to deal with various types of emergency:



haemorrhages.
cardiovascular failure,
respiratory distress,
states of shock,
skull injuries,
burns,
fractures, dislocations, sprains,
wounds, exposure to cold,
drownings,
electrocutions,
poisoning,
bites from venomous snakes.


B. Development of working methods to deal with various aspects of public health:



health information network, use of record cards, notebooks and registers, drafting reports,
disease-monitoring system,
action to promote mental health and deal with psychological difficulties,
psychological and physical rehabilitation, use of prostheses,
education for health, hygiene and a clean environment,
control of endemic diseases (diarrhoea, tuberculosis, malaria, parasitic diseases, vaccinabte diseases),
monitoring of nutritional status, remedial diets, education on nutrition (in famine areas).
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